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We know what you have heard and many people claim that chewing gum or mint, using mouthwash and brushing one’s mouth repeatedly before testing can help a drug user test clean. Increasing sensitivity of the tests, however, makes this a risky proposition. The tests are supposed to detect secretions that cannot be washed away with mouthwash. Chewing gum in particular is a mistake since it will most likely add chemicals to the oral secretions and not remove drug traces.

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New Law: A new section of the law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as section 1-1971A of Title
63, reads as follows: Each Medicare home care agency, as defined in section 1-1961 of Title 63 of the
Oklahoma Statutes, shall be required to adopt a written random drug-testing policy as set forth in
section 555 of Title 40 of Oklahoma Statutes. This act became effective as of November 1, 2015.

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Our bodies eliminate alcohol at an average rate of .015% per hour. Nothing can speed up this process of
eliminating alcohol - NOT exercise , coffee, or cold showers. They may wake a person up, but they do not
reduce alcohol level. The body removes approximately one drink per hour. A person who drinks
slowly -- about one drink an hour -- will not become significantly intoxicated. Generally, if a woman
drinks the same amount of alcohol as a man dose, of the same weight, a woman will have a higher BAC
than the man. Alcohol saturates all water bearing tissue (primarily muscle tissue) in our bodies.
Because men tend to have more muscle tissue than women, a dose of alcohol is more diluted in a man .
And more concentrated in a woman. The legal limit for drunk driving varies from .08% to .10 % BAC for
adults. Federal regulations prohibit safety sensitive employees from working with an alcohol level of
0.02% BAC or greater. This resource information comes from Alcopro Drug and Alcohol Testing Products.

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Loperamide Abuse is Associated With Cardiac Dysrhythmia and Death ... Imodium is a popular brand of the drug loperamide.
Some people addicted to oxycodone and other opioids are now turning to widely available diarrhea medications to manage their withdrawal symptoms or get high.
The results can be dangerous to the heart — and sometimes fatal — warn toxicologists in a study recently published online in the Annals of Emergency Medicine .
The researchers describe two case studies where people who were addicted to opioids tried to ease their withdrawal symptoms b y taking many times the recommended dose of
loperamide , a drug commonly used to treat diarrhea. Both patients died.

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Fentanyl, which looks like heroin, is a powerful synthetic painkiller that has been laced into heroin but is
increasingly being sold by itself — often without the user ’ s knowledge. It is up to 50 times more
powerful than heroin and up to 100 times more potent than morphine. A tiny bit can be fatal. Fentanyl represents the latest wave of a rolling drug epidemic that has been fueled by
prescription painkillers, as addicts continue to seek higher highs and cheaper fixes.
“It started out as an opioid epidemic, then heroin, but now it’s a fentanyl epidemic,”
Maura Healey, the attorney general of Massachusetts, said in an interview.
Fentanyl on a patch or in a lozenge has been used since the 1960s in medical settings to
treat extreme pain. In recent decades, illicit fentanyl has seeped into the United States
from Mexico.
From < http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/26/us/heroin-fentanyl.html?_r=0 >

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